Area profiles

Gordon:

Positioned in the leafy Upper North Shore of Sydney, Gordon is 15 kilometres north-west of the Sydney Central Business District and is the administrative centre for the local government area of Ku-ring-gai Council.

Gordon is located on a major transport artery, the Pacific Highway and near the intersection of Ryde and Mona Vale Roads which form a link between the northern beaches, Homebush Bay and the St George District and Sutherland Shire.

Gordon railway station is on the North Shore, Northern & Western Line of the Sydney Trains network with frequent commuter services. Lifts to the platforms have been a recent addition. A bus stop outside the station is a terminus for various routes including those to St Ives, West Pymble, Mona Vale/Warriewood and Macquarie University. These are operated by Forest Coach Lines.

Gordon is home to two schools:

Gordon West Public School is named for the suburb, but is located in West Pymble.

Gordon Community Preschool supports children from 3 – 5 years of age.

Given its central locality and fantastic transport links, residents of Gordon have access to many other high-performing schools in the surrounding suburbs.

Gordon has a commercial area with many shops and restaurants along the Pacific Highway and around Gordon railway station. Gordon Centre, is a shopping centre owned by Charter Hall which includes a Harvey Norman, Woolworths and many stores and offices. Household hardware chain Bunnings Warehouse and McDonald’s are located near the Pacific Highway. Gordon Village Arcade is a shopping arcade also owned by Charter Hall and includes many stores including a Post Office.

The administrative buildings for the local government area of Ku-ring-gai Council are located in Gordon.

Churches in Gordon comprise: St Johns Anglican Church (with an adjoining cemetery and columbarium), Gordon Uniting Church, Gordon Baptist Church and The Liberal Catholic Church of St. Francis.

56.6% of occupied private dwellings in Gordon are separate houses, 39.3% are flats, units or apartments and 4.0% are semi-detached (mainly townhouses). The average household consists of 2.9 people.[1]

At the 2016 census, there were 7,668 residents in Gordon.

  • The population of Gordon was older than average, with a median age of 40 compared to the national median of 38, and 15.9% of people aged 65 years and over.
  • 48.1% of people were born in Australia. The next most common countries of birth were China 11.0%, South Korea 5.2%, England 4.5%, Hong Kong 3.7% and Taiwan 2.6%.
  • 56.0% of people only spoke English at home. Other languages spoken at home included Mandarin 15.1%, Cantonese 7.4%, Korean 6.0%, Japanese 1.5% and Persian 1.4%.
  • The median household income of $2,313 was higher than the national figure of $1,438.
  • The median weekly rent being $650 and the median monthly mortgage payment being $2,800.
  • The most popular responses to the Census question about religion were No Religion 36.4%, Anglican 15.0% and Catholic 14.5%.[1]

History:

The name ‘Gordon’ first appears as the name of the survey parish covering most of the upper north shore, assigned by the NSW Surveyor-General Sir Thomas Mitchell. This is believed to commemorate Sir Willoughby Gordon, with whom he had served during the Peninsular War.

Settlement of the area commenced from around 1820. The early settlement at Gordon was originally known as Lane Cove. The earliest school at ‘Lane Cove’, as Gordon was then known, was established at the behest of Governor Macquarie in 1816.[3] The first Lane Cove Post Office opened on 1 February 1860. The name of the village and Post Office was changed to Gordon, after the Gordondale estate of Robert McIntosh, on 1 June 1879.[3][4]Gordon Railway Station on the North Shore Line was built in 1888.

The railway station was built in 1888 and has an important heritage relationship with its landscaped gardens; it has been preserved as an example of a historic Edwardian station.

Gordon Public School, now used as a library, was constructed in 1878 on the Pacific Highway, having been designed by George Mansfield. A Gothic Revival style was used in accordance with the tradition that educational buildings, like churches, were designed in a Gothic style. A second block was added in 1912. The school was originally called Lane Cove School, and the name was officially changed to Gordon Public School in November 1885.[3] The school buildings are one of the few remaining buildings that date back to the pioneering days of northern Sydney. It is listed on the Register of the National Estate.[5] The Gordon Public School was closed in 1989, however East Gordon Public School and West Gordon Public School remain nearby.

Gordon Centre was originally built as a Farmers & Co department store, now part of Myer, before reopening as Gordon Centre in 1985.

Eryldene is a local historic house that is open to the public. Located in McIntosh Street, the house was designed for Professor Eben Gowrie Waterhouse by William Hardy Wilson and built circa 1913. The extensive garden is a significant part of the property in its own right. House and garden as a whole are listed on the Register of the National Estate.[11][12] The house also has a state heritage listing.[13]

Another notable home in the area is Tulkiyan, located on the Pacific Highway. This home was designed by Bertrand James Waterhouse, an architect who was popular for his residential work (he was also responsible for the design of Nutcote, the home of painter May Gibbs). He designed Tulkiyan in the Arts and Crafts style that he favoured in much of his work. Tulkiyan was built on part of a land grant that went back to 1823. The land changed hands many times until it was acquired by the Donaldson family, who commissioned Waterhouse to design the house. It stayed in the hands of the Donaldson family until 1994, when it was bequeathed to Ku-ring-gai Council. Tulkiyan has a state heritage listing.

The Arts and Crafts style favoured by Waterhouse was just one of the styles that were part of the Federation period that went from 1890 to 1915. Other prominent styles were the Federation Queen Anne style—the Australian version of the English Queen Anne style—and the Federation Bungalow style. Some notable examples of the latter style can be seen in Nelson Street, Gordon. Other architects who favoured Federation styles were Walter Liberty Vernon and Howard Joseland.

Gordon is also the location of a notable house designed by the architect Alexander Stewart Jolly. Nebraska, in Yarabah Avenue, is a distinctive home reminiscent of a log cabin. One of its features is the irregular stonework. It is heritage-listed.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordon,_New_South_Wales

 

St Ives:

SItuated in the tranquil and leafy Upper North Shore of Sydney, St Ives is 18 kilometres north of the Sydney Central Business District in the local government area of Ku-ring-gai Council.

St Ives Shopping Village opened in the 1960s. The centre has over 110 stores, including; Harris Farm Markets, Coles and Woolworths as well as specialty food outlets, boutique fashion stores and cafes.

Village Green is a popular park in St Ives. Village Green is directly opposite St Ives Shopping Village.The park is bordered on three streets, Memorial Avenue, Village Green Parade and Cowan Road. The park includes sporting fields, baseball fields, tennis courts and a skate park.

St Ives is home to many prestigious and high-achieving schools including;

St Ives boasts several sporting teams and facilities including;

At the 2016 census, St Ives recorded a population of 17,300. Of these:[1]

  • The median age was 42 years. Children aged 0 – 14 years made up 20.8% of the population and people aged 65 years and over made up 19.7% of the population.
  • 51.8% of people were born in Australia. The next most common countries of birth were South Africa 8.6%, China 7.1%, England 6.3%, Hong Kong 2.0% and New Zealand 2.0%.
  • 69.0% of people only spoke English at home. Other languages spoken at home included Mandarin 8.7%, Cantonese 3.7%, Korean 2.4%, Persian 1.7% and Spanish 0.9%.
  • The most common responses for religion were No Religion 28.6%, Anglican 17.6%, Catholic 17.3% and Judaism 9.7%.
  • 82.9% of households were family households and 16.2% were single person households.
  • Of occupied private dwellings in St Ives, 70.1% were separate houses, 20.2% were flats or apartments and 9.5% were semi-detached.[1]

History:

The St Ives area was first explored by Governor Arthur Phillip and a party of men in 1788 where they set up a campsite at Bungaroo which is close to what is now Hunter Avenue. The area produced a small scale timber felling industry. There are still some examples of the thirty metre and higher trees in nearby Pymble in the Dalrymple Hay forest and near Canisius College. Native turpentine trees were also once abundant and provided useful timber for cabinet making. It was once known for its apple orchards but due to residential demand, there is no longer any commercial fruit growing in the area.[2] During the Second World War there were significant numbers of troops barracked in the area, which provided the impetus to build Archbold Road as a supplementary and emergency route to the city. Since 1950 the suburb has expanded from the central shopping areas and the arterial main roads to include hilltop and valley areas bordering on the surrounding Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park to the north, now the area known as St Ives Chase, and Garigal National Park to the east and the south east.

St Ives Post Office opened on 10 November 1885 [3] and the first public school opened on 6 May 1889.[4] The school was formally opened by Mr. J. P. Burns, M.L.A. on Saturday 8 June. After inspecting the “neat and well-designed school and teacher’s residence” the party had a luncheon to mark the occasion.[5]

In the late 1890s, St Ives was populated by market gardeners, a small dairy, orchard workers and related industries.

St Ives Shopping Village opened in the 1960s.

Since the end of the Second World War St Ives has seen its most rapid period of expansion and a steady growth of families moving to the area.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Ives,_New_South_Wales

 

Lindfield:

Positioned in the highly-sought after Upper North Shore of Sydney Lindfield is 13 kilometres north-west of the Sydney Central Business District and is in the local government area of Ku-ring-gai Council.

This suburb of 5.17 square kilometres contains residential housing of California bungalow and federation style, in double brick and tile construction. Australian native bushland in Garigal National Park and Lane Cove National Park borders the suburb. The suburb is known for its leafy surrounds and relaxed suburban lifestyle.

Lindfield railway station is on the North Shore, Northern & Western Line of the Sydney Trains network and is about 30 minutes by train from the Sydney central business district. The Pacific Highway is the main arterial road through Lindfield. Lindfield has a small commercial area on both sides of Lindfield railway station on the Pacific Highway and Lindfield Avenue. The former Commonwealth Bank is an art deco style building on the Pacific Highway.

Lindfield has five places of worship: St Albans Anglican Church, Holy Family Catholic Church, Lindfield Uniting Church (with church buildings on Tryon Road and the Pacific Highway) and the North Shore Synagogue.

Schools in the suburb comprise: Lindfield Public School, Lindfield East Public School, Newington College Preparatory School, Holy Family Catholic Primary School, Masada College (K-6) and Lindfield Learning Village public school.

 

Lindfield Library is a branch of the Ku-ring-gai Municipal Library Network. There are two community halls: East Lindfield Community Hall at Crana Avenue and West Lindfield Community Hall at Moore Avenue. There are two tennis courts at Lindfield Community Centre (behind the library) and a further two courts at Lindfield Park in Tryon Road.

Commercial developments in Lindfield are situated along the Pacific Highway, Lindfield Shopping Village and nearby Tryon Road.

Lindfield Arcade was demolished in 2016 in order to facilitate the construction of residential apartments.

Lindfield is home to many food stores and restaurants including;

  • Coles
  • Supamart IGA
  • Harris Farm
  • 2 Chinese Restaurants (Chan’s and West Lindfield)
  • KFC
  • Subway

At the 2016 census, Lindfield recorded a population of 9,791. Of these:

  • Lindfield residents’ median age was 39 years, higher than the national median of 38. Children aged under 15 years made up 20.3% of the population (national average is 18.7%) and people aged 65 years and over made up 16.0% of the population (national average is 15.8%).
  • 56.6% of people were born in Australia. The most common countries of birth were China 7.8%, England 4.5%, Hong Kong 3.9%, South Korea 2.5% and India 1.7%. 64.2% of people only spoke English at home. Other languages spoken at home included Mandarin 9.7%, Cantonese 7.9%, Korean 2.9% and Japanese 1.3%.
  • The median weekly household income was $2,513, higher than the national median of $1,438.
  • Stand-alone houses accounted 59.7% of occupied private dwellings, while 37.4% were flats, units or apartments. The average household size was 2.8 people.
  • The most common responses for religion in Lindfield were No Religion 32.8%, Catholic 20.6% and Anglican 16.8%.

 

History:

Lindfield was originally the home of the Ku-ring-gai indigenous people.

Europeans first became active in the area in around 1810, when the colonial government set up a timber gathering camp staffed by convicts.[3] By the 1840s, fruit growing and farming became the suburb’s primary industries. Settlement began to increase in the latter half of the nineteenth century. The Lindfield railway station opened in 1890,[4] and Lindfield Post Office opened on 5 January 1895.[5] Land values increased in the area around the railway and more professionals moved into the area.[3]

The name “Lindfield” means a clearing in the lime forest, and derives from the name given by an early landowner, Francis List, to a cottage he built in the area in 1884.[3] List likely named his cottage after Lindfield, Sussex, England.[3] When a railway line came through the area in 1890s, the name of the property was used to identify the station and neighbourhood.[6]

During the years after World War II the suburb experienced significant growth.[6]

Lindfield has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

The University of Technology, Sydney, Ku-ring-gai Campus (formerly William Balmain Teachers College) operated at a campus on Eton Road from 1971 to 2015.[8] It offered courses in business, nursing and midwifery, education and travel. The site has been re-developed as Lindfield Learning Village public school, opened in 2019. The school has a strong foundational value of community and has been praised for its innovative approach.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lindfield,_New_South_Wales

 

Killara

Situated in the desirable Upper North Shore of Sydney, Killara is 14 kilometres north of the Sydney Central Business District in the local government area of Ku-ring-gai Council.

The majority of residential properties in Killara are built in the Federation and Californian Bungalow styles, although the suburb includes many other styles.

Killara railway station is on the North Shore, Northern & Western Line of the Sydney Trains network. The Pacific Highway is the main road through Killara. Churches in the suburb comprise St Martin’s Anglican Church and Killara Uniting Church (formerly Killara Congregational Church) on Karranga Avenue.

The Swain Gardens were donated to Ku-ring-gai Council by Mr Swain, a Sydney bookseller, in the 1920s, and are today maintained by the council and volunteers. The gardens have been listed by the National Trust of Australia.

 

Killara is served by two top ranking public primary schools, Killara Public School and Beaumont Road Public School. The suburb is also home to Killara High School, one of the highest performing non-selective government secondary school in the state of New South Wales.[8][9] A short-lived private school in Killara, Abbotsholme College, counted two future prime ministers among its pupils.

 

Commercial developments are located along the length of the Pacific Highway, including the Greengate Hotel. Residents often travel to nearby suburbs of Gordon, Macquarie Park and Chatswood for regular shopping.

Features of Killara

Places of Worship in Killara

  • St Martin’s Anglican Church
  • Killara Uniting Church
  • Marian Street Theatre

In the 2016 Australian census, the total population of Killara was 10,574 people; 47.5 percent were male and 52.5 percent were female. Of these;

  • 53.7% of people were born in Australia.
  • The next most common countries of birth were China 11.5%, England 4.7%, Hong Kong 3.9%, South Korea 2.7% and New Zealand 1.8%.
  • 61.1% of people only spoke English at home.
  • Other languages spoken at home included Mandarin 13.9%, Cantonese 7.6%, Korean 3.2% and Japanese 1.0%.
  • The most common responses for religion were No Religion 35.5%, Catholic 17.7% and Anglican 15.8%,
  • Of persons aged 15 years and over, 59.1% were married, 28.2% never married, 5.8% widowed 5.2% divorced, and 1.6% separated.
  • At the 2016 census, 57.5% of occupied private dwellings were separate houses and 40.5% were flat or apartments. The average household size was 2.9 people.
  • The median weekly personal income was A$951, compared with A$662 in Australia. The median weekly household income was A$2,534, compared with A$1,438 in Australia. The median weekly family income was A$2,918, compared with A$1,734 in Australia.

History

Killara is an Aboriginal word meaning permanent or always there.[2] The name of the suburb was chosen when the railway line opened in 1899. James George Edwards was a representative of the people who requested a station be built here. The suburb was established as a ‘Gentlemen’s suburb’, designed so that there would be no commercial ventures in the area. For this reason, the suburb has very few shops in the original development.[2]

Killara Post Office opened on 7 November 1904.

Killara later became the home of the famous architect Harry Seidler, whose home—designed by him and his wife Penelope in the 1960s—can still be seen at 13 Kalang Avenue. It is sometimes known as Killara House and sometimes as Harry and Penelope Seidler House. The couple moved into the house on Harry Seidler’s birthday in 1967. The 1960s-era modern-design home, constructed with reinforced masonry walls, concrete floors and roof, rubble-stone retaining walls and fireplace, won the Wilkinson Award in 1967. The garden contains a sculpture by the Los Angeles sculptor Eric Orr. The house is heritage-listed.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killara

 

Roseville

Situated in the leafy and tranquil Upper North Shore of Sydney, Roseville is 12 kilometres north-west of the Sydney central business district. Roseville is within the local government areas of Ku-ring-gai and Willoughby.

Roseville is the southern-most suburb in the municipality of Ku-ring-gai. It is a residential suburb, with medium to low density housing and lies between Findlay Avenue and Ashley Street to the south; and Bayswater Road, Abingdon Road, Chelmsford Avenue and Carnarvon Road to the north. A narrow section of the southernmost area of Roseville, between Ashley Street and Boundary Street, is in the Willoughby municipality. To the east, Roseville is bounded by the waterways of Middle Harbour and Moores Creek, and to the west it is bounded by the Lane Cove National Park. Roseville Chase is surrounded by Babbage Road, Middle Harbour and Moores Creek, and is bisected by Warringah Road, which Roseville Bridge carries over Middle Harbour.

Characterised by its lush and leafy roadsides, parks, and gardens; Roseville properties are highly sought after. Houses closer to railway station tend to be constructed in the Federation (c. 1890s to 1920s) and Californian bungalow (c. 1920s to 1930s) architectural styles, with the outer areas developed during the 1940s and 1950s in less ornate styles. Since this time, a small portion of these older homes have been demolished and replaced with new development properties.

Roseville is home to two schools: Roseville Public School (K-6) and Roseville College (Girls’ school) (K-12). Roseville is also home to several churches: St Luke’s (Roseville) Presbyterian Church, Lord Street; Roseville Uniting Church, Lord Street; The Chinese Christian Assembly of Sydney, Moore Street; and St Andrew’s Anglican Church. St Andrew’s is on the corner of Hill Street and Bancroft Avenue. Its foundation stone was laid by the Archbishop of Sydney, The Most Rev. H. W. K. Mowll, D.D., 27 April 1935, while the rector was W. J. Roberts.[12]

Roseville railway station is on the North Shore, Northern & Western Line of the Sydney Trains network. Roseville has a small commercial area beside Roseville railway station on the Pacific Highway and Hill Street.

Roseville is well known for the amount of sleepy lush green gardens and parks that surround it. Some of the parks in Roseville include: Kimo Street Bush, Lower Blue Gum Creek Bush, Loyal Henry Park, Roseville Park, Roseville West Park, and Muston Park.

Roseville is also home to several sport and recreation facilities including; Roseville Lawn Tennis Club, Roseville Golf Club, Rotary Club of Roseville Chase. Roseville Cricket Club,East Roseville Bowling Club, Roseville Chase oval and Roseville Tennis Academy. Roseville also boasts quaint cafes and the iconic Roseville cinema.

At the 2016 census, Roseville recorded a population of 10,082. Of these:[1]

Age distribution

The distribution of ages in Roseville was fairly similar to the country as a whole. Roseville residents’ median age was 38 years the same as the national median. Children aged under 15 years made up 21.6% of the population (national average is 18.7%) and people aged 65 years and over made up 15.1% of the population (national average is 15.8%).

Ethnic diversity

60.8% of people were born in Australia. The next most common countries of birth were China 7.7%, England 4.6%, Hong Kong 2.5%, New Zealand 1.9% and South Korea 1.7%. 68.8% of people only spoke English at home. Other languages spoken at home included Mandarin 9.1%, Cantonese 5.4%, Korean 1.9% and Japanese 1.0%.

Religion

The most common responses for religion were No Religion 32.5%, Catholic 21.4% and Anglican 17.7%.

Income

The median weekly household income was $2,832, compared to the national median of $1,438.

Housing

Stand-alone houses accounted for 73.4% of residences, while 23.2% were flats, units or apartments and 3.1% were semi-detached. The average household size was 3.0 people.

History:

William Henry was one of Ku-ring-gai’s first European settlers, who used the area for farming.There were a few fruit orchards and market gardens in the area. Other significant settlers were David Mathew, who owned a property called Clanville, and Richard Archbold, who was granted an area of 600 acres (2.4 km2) adjacent to Clanville. Archbold later acquired Clanville and set up an orchard on the property. Archbold’s son-in-law had a stone cottage called Rose Villa, which was later demolished to make way for the North Shore railway line. Roseville eventually derived its name from Rose Villa.

Roseville Post Office opened on 8 July 1901. Roseville East Post Office opened on 1 December 1937.

Babbage Road was named for Eden Herschel Babbage (a grandson of Charles Babbage), a retired banker who lived in “Rawhiti” on Clanville Road. Dubbed the “Father of Roseville”, he was largely responsible for developing Roseville Park, Davidson Park and Roseville Chase. His brother-in-law, Francis Robert Burton, donated the large pavilion in Roseville Park, following the death in 1913 of his brother William Burton, of “Woodlands” on Bancroft Avenue.

The Australian photographer Harold Cazneaux (1878 to 1953) lived for much of his life in a Federation home called “Ambleside”, located in Dudley Avenue.

At the time of his appointment as Premier of New South Wales in 2011, Barry O’Farrell lived with his family in Roseville, but as of 2012 resided at nearby Turramurra. As a member of parliament, Barry O’Farrell represented the electoral district of Ku-ring-gai, which Roseville falls within.

The historic Roseville Cinema on the Pacific Highway is noted for its art deco facade. Originally a hall and community centre, the building later became a church and preparatory school. Its transformation into a cinema began when it became Traynor’s Picture Palace in 1919, but did not become a full-scale cinema until 1936. Roseville Cinema was renovated and extended to accommodate two screens in 1995. The former Commonwealth Bank is another notable art deco building on the Pacific Highway.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roseville,_New_South_Wales

 

Pymble

Positioned in the leafy Upper North Shore of Sydney, Pymble is 16 kilometres north-west of the Sydney Central Business District in the local government area of Ku-ring-gai Council. West Pymble is a separate suburb, surrounded by Lane Cove National Park.

 

Pymble railway station is on the Sydney Trains North Shore, Northern & Western Line. Transdev NSW buses operate route 579 from Pymble Station (departing Grandview St) to East Turramurra (peak hours only) and route 560 from Gordon Station to West Pymble (half-hourly service). Route 575 also operates along the pacific highway past the railway station (half-hourly service). It goes to West Pymble & Macquarie southbound & to Turramurra & Hornsby northbound. There is a taxi stand on the eastern side of the station in Grandview Street.

Features of Pymble

  • Pymble Station
  • Pymble Hill
  • Ku-ring-gai Town Hall

Places of Worship in Pymble

  • Pymble Chapel
  • St Swithun’s Anglican Church
  • Walter Cresswell O’Reilly lookout

Schools in Pymble

  • Pymble Ladies’ College (K-12)
  • Pymble Public School
  • Sacred Heart Catholic Primary School (K-6)
  • Gordon West Public School (K-6) located in West Pymble

Parks and Recreation in Pymble

  • Pymble Park
  • Bannockburn Oval
  • The Pymble Soldiers Memorial
  • Dalrymple-Hay Nature Reserve
  • Sheldon Forest

Sports and Recreation in Pymble

  • West Pymble Football Club
  • Pymble Golf Club
  • North Shore Gym
  • Avondale Golf Club

History:

Based on settlers’ accounts, the land that came to be known as Pymble was traversed by, and at least periodically inhabited by, the Cammeraigal clan or tribe of the Kuringai (also known as Guringai) Aborigines. The Cammeraigal had occupied the land between the Lane Cove River, Hawkesbury and east to the coast. They would travel from grounds at Cowan Creek to the Parramatta River via Pymble – passing west through the land where Pymble Ladies’ College now stands, through the Lane Cove Valley and North Ryde. En route they would reportedly hold corroborees at the current site of the Pymble Reservoir on Telegraph Rd and camp at the junction of Merrivale Rd and Selwyn St.

Pymble is named after Robert Pymble (1776–1861), an influential early settler whose 1823 land grant comprised some 600 acres, around half the land of the region. The other half (plus a large part of St Ives) was granted to Daniel der Matthew’s, another influential settler who established the first sawmill in the area.

The region was important to the early Sydney colony as a major supplier of timber for a wide variety of uses. The main timber varieties were blackbutt, stringybark, iron bark and blue gum. In later years it was also an important supplier of agricultural produce. It became widely known for the high quality of its produce and especially for its oranges which had been introduced to the area by Robert Pymble sometime around 1828 and which by later years were grown extensively throughout the region by numerous different growers following land sub-divisions.


Eventually agriculture and small farming gave way to residential development with residential sub-divisions commencing around 1879. The first bank – the Australian Joint Stock Bank – was established in 1888 in a then prominent house known as Grandview built on Pymble Hill ca 1883 by the son of local hotelier Richard Porter. Porter had opened the Gardener’s Arms Hotel, also on Pymble Hill, in 1866. From this time the centre of commercial activity came to be at the top of the hill around the Pacific Highway and Bannockburn Road area, but with the railway station being located by necessity at the bottom of the hill development began to shift towards the new railway station at the foot of the hill. Pymble Post Office opened there on 6 August 1890.


Heritage listings
Pymble has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

Pacific Highway: Pymble Reservoirs No. 1 and No. 2[8][9]
982-984 Pacific Highway: Pymble Substation[10]
29 Telegraph Road: Eric Pratten House[11]

 

Turramurra

Turramurra is a suburb on the Upper North Shore of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. It is located 17 kilometres north of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of Ku-ring-gai Council. It shares the postcode of 2074 with the adjacent suburbs of North Turramurra, South Turramurra and Warrawee.

Features of Turramurra

Places of Worship in Turramurra

  • Turramurra Uniting Church
  • North Turramurra Church of Christ
  • St James Turramurra
  • St Philip’s Anglican Church, South Turramurra
  • Turramurra Baptist Church

Schools in Turramurra

Parks and Recreation in Turramurra

Sports and Recreation in Turramurra

  • Comenarra Park
  • Kissing Point Football Club
  • Kent Oval
  • Hamilton Park
  • Turramurra Recreation Centre
  • Karuah Oval

 

Warrawee

Warrawee is a suburb on the Upper North Shore of Sydney in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Warrawee is located 21 kilometres north-west of the Sydney Central Business District in the local government area of Ku-ring-gai Council. Warrawee is predominantly a residential area with few commercial entities. Notably its railway station provides no commercial activity (unique in this regard within the Sydney network).

Features of Warrawee

Schools in Warrawee

Parks and Recreation in Warrawee

Sports and Recreation in Warrawee

 

Wahroonga

Wahroonga is a suburb on the Upper North Shore of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia 22 kilometres north-west of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of Ku-ring-gai Council and Hornsby Shire.

Features of Wahroonga

  • Wahroonga Post Office
  • Wahroonga shopping village
  • Wahroonga Railway Station
  • Hampden Avenue shopping centre in East Wahroonga
  • Fox Valley Shopping Centre in South Wahroonga
  • The Sydney Adventist Hospital
  • The Rose Seidler House

Places of Worship in Wahroonga

  • Holy Name Catholic Church,
  • St John’s Uniting Church,
  • St Andrew’s Anglican Church,
  • St Pauls Anglican Church,
  • Wahroonga Presbyterian Church
  • The Wahroonga Seventh Day Adventist Church.

Schools in Wahroonga

Parks and Recreation in Wahroonga

Sports and Recreation in Wahroonga

  • Tensegrity Sports and Chiropractic Clinics

 

Waitara

Waitara is a suburb of Upper North ShoreSydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia 23 kilometres north-west of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of Hornsby Shire.

Features of Waitara

Places of Worship in Waitara

  • Our Lady of the Rosary Catholic Church
  • Korean Catholic Community Church
  • The Anglican Church of Waitara
  • The Seventh-day Adventist Church

Schools in Waitara

  • Waitara Public School
  • Our Lady of the Rosary Primary School
  • Junior School Basketball Courts

Parks and Recreation in Waitara

  • Mark Taylor Oval
  • Peter Taylor Field

Sports and Recreation in Waitara

  • Millennium Health Club.
  • Performing Arts Centre
  • The Avenue Tennis Courts
  • Catholic Healthcare McQuoin Park

 

Hornsby

Hornsby is a suburb on the Upper North Shore of Sydney in the Australianstate of New South Wales 25 kilometres north-west of the Sydney central business district. It is the administrative centre of the local government area of Hornsby Shire.

Features of Hornsby

Places of Worship in Hornsby

  • Hornsby Uniting Church
  • Community Church Hornsby
  • Christian Fellowship Hornsby
  • Hornsby Catholic Parish

Schools in Hornsby

Parks in Hornsby

  • Lisgar Gardens
  • Edgeworth David Gardens
  • Ginger Meggs Park
  • Reddy Park
  • Rofe Park
  • Willow Park
  • Crosslands Reserve
  • Holman Park
  • Montview Park and Oval
  • Hornsby Park

Sports and Recreation in Hornsby

  • Hornsby Aquatic Centre
  • Hornsby Mountain Bike Trail
  • Asquith Bowling & Recreation Club
  • Hornsby RSL Gymnastics Club
  • IC Sports Therapies